Info. on “hypoallergenic dogs”

A_Young_Boy_Sneezing_In_a_Tissue_Royalty_Free_Clipart_Picture_090819-137803-338054      The truth about hypoallergenic dogs, breed-specific allergen, tips for finding your perfect dog, and recommended “reduced allergic reaction” breeds.

      The pet allergy problem in the U.S. is considerable; about 10 percent of the U.S. population is allergic to animals, according to the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. For those persons afflicted with asthma, the rate is even higher – approximately 25%. Allergic reactions to pets can range from bothersome (itchy or watery eyes) to downright dangerous, such as asthma attacks that constrict breathing.

      It is no wonder that “hypoallergenic dogs” is such a highly searched term on the internet. The 10 – 25% of families that can not currently have a dog are searching for an answer; they would like a “best friend” for their home. But before we claim that there are dog breeds that are hypoallergenic, lets clarify that term. By “hypoallergenic” we mean breeds that result in a “reduced allergic reaction” among allergy sufferers; thus a smaller likelihood of causing allergy symptoms. Clearly, we do not mean “non-allergic,” because non-allergic breeds simply do not exist.
The truth about hypoallergenic dogs, breed-specific allergen, tips for finding your perfect dog, and recommended “reduced allergic reaction” breeds. 

     The pet allergy problem in the U.S. is considerable; about 10 percent of the U.S. population is allergic to animals, according to the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. For those persons afflicted with asthma, the rate is even higher – approximately 25%. Allergic reactions to pets can range from bothersome (itchy or watery eyes) to downright dangerous, such as asthma attacks that constrict breathing.
     It is no wonder that “hypoallergenic dogs” is such a highly searched term on the internet. The 10 – 25% of families that can not currently have a dog are searching for an answer; they would like a “best friend” for their home. But before we claim that there are dog breeds that are hypoallergenic, lets clarify that term. By “hypoallergenic” we mean breeds that result in a “reduced allergic reaction” among allergy sufferers; thus a smaller likelihood of causing allergy symptoms. Clearly, we do not mean “non-allergic,” because non-allergic breeds simply do not exist.

Dog allergen

 Dog allergens are very small, sticky, and lightweight. Originating in a dog’s skin, saliva, and urine, the dander and saliva allergens are able to drift about your home, contaminating everything. All dog allergen is not the same, however, which is good news for allergy sufferers. Some pet allergens are breed-specific, so some breeds produce less than others. Examples of breeds that can produce less allergen are poodles, airedales, and schnauzers. These breeds shed their skin about every 21 days. Compare this to cocker spaniels, german shepards, and Irish setters, which shed their skin every three to four days and you can understand how some breeds allow you to “breathe easier.”

      You’re probably thinking; “I just need to find a hairless dog and that will end my pet allergy!” Nope, that won’t do it. Although many people think “hairless” or short-haired dogs cause fewer problems for those with allergies, it is the dander (skin scales) that causes the most significant allergic reactions, not the length or amount of hair on the pet, according to the ACAAI. The fur, however, can present problems to the allergic individual. Dog fur can collect allergens such as pollen, dust, and mold and spread these allergens throughout your home.

hypoallergenic dogs and pet allergy tips

So basically there is no dog that is truly hypoallergenic. There are, however, things you can do that will help you minimize your pet allergy with the dog of your choice:

 • Research the dog you are interested in

* Try to be around they type of dog you are interested in before you purchase one.

 • Have your dog groomed oftten

 • Bathe your dog often as well to help remove some allergens in its fur

 • If you have asthma, keep medication on hand in case of an attack

 

This info was found at a very helpful website.         http://www.allergyescape.com/hypoallergenic-dog.html

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